Sugoi Helium

Sugoi Helium

I recently bought a Sugoi Helium jacket. It replaces a couple of jackets I’ve had for a long time, neither of which meets my current needs.

The Helium’s perfect for me – lightweight (85gms/3 oz), wind- and water-resistant, and nicely fitted. Though pretty minimalist, it’s got the requisite reflective thingies, a couple of zippered pockets, and rolls up into a tidy, small package. It’ll serve me well for cool weather runs this fall, and will be ideal for the Race to the Stones 100K next summer, where the weather will be variable and, well… English.

(For a good summary of the Helium’s features, check out the short review of an older version of the jacket by Tom Caughlan for iRunFar here.)

I bought the Helium online from Running Free Canada. Not only was it on sale, Running Free’s excellent customer service made the transaction a pleasure. I recommend these folks highly!

Compression Kit

I’ve recently started wearing compression clothing on my runs. Never thought I’d see the day, to tell the truth. I’ve long been a “less is more” kind of guy – my usual kit has been just a pair of old school side-split shorts and minimalist sandals.

Why such a dramatic turnaround? Because compression kit works for me, that’s why.

The theory behind compression clothing, in a nutshell, is that it optimizes bloodflow, thereby improving performance, enhancing stamina, and speeding recovery. Proving that it actually works is very much under discussion, though. Folks who like compression garments won’t run without them. Folks who dislike them say they’re more about fashion than fact.

That said, my research turned up this study (among others) in favour of compression clothing. (The journey to a decision also involved anti-anxiety garments for dogs and my Asperger’s Syndrome. But that’s a story for another post.) So I decided I’d give them a try.

I’m pleased to say they work for me. They work very well, in fact. I now own two Under Armour compression shirts (one long-sleeve, one short-sleeve) and a pair of 2XU compression shorts.

Long story short… I run better when wearing my new compression kit. Form is better, pace is better, and recovery is better. The shirts seem to enhance better arm swing, and the shorts allow for better hip extension and flexion. I’m better able to hold my core firmly and strongly.

A couple of added benefits are: 1/ Compression clothing keeps me cooler on a hot day. It spreads out the sweat, which then evaporates more efficiently. 2/ Because compression garments move less against the skin than loose clothing, chafing is reduced or eliminated. No more BodyGlide. No more nipple tape. That makes them a very good thing.

A note of caution: If you’re self-conscious about your body image, you may not want to go the compression route. Compression garments are, by definition, tight. I’m reasonably lean (142 lbs/64.4 kgs on a 5’7″/170cm frame), but I felt like a sausage in a too-small casing the first time I put on a compression shirt. It didn’t take long to get used to it, though.

For me, it’s all good. Highly recommended, if you’re willing to try something new.

Bucket List

Once in while, I like to make a list of races I’d like to run. Not saying I’ll get to all of them, but it’s nice to keep them in mind. Here’s my current bucket list:

Race to the Stones

A 100K ultra along The Ridgeway, a 5,000 year old path in the UK. The course passes Iron Age forts and ancient burial chambers, crosses the Thames and the Salisbury Plain, and finishes at the 3,000-year-old stone circle at Avebury.

I plan to run The Race to the Stones in July of 2015.

Two Oceans Marathon

Billed as “the world’s most beautiful marathon,” this is actually an ultra, not a marathon. It takes place in Cape Town, South Africa, and runs 56K from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean.

I was born in South Africa, so doing Two Oceans would be a kind of homecoming for me.

Ultra-Trail Harricana

Back to Canada, in Quebec’s Charlevoix region – remote and wild, with rolling terrain, fjords, and wide bays. The Harricana 65K is a true wilderness ultra, featuring 1,800 meters of elevation gain.

This would be my first wilderness ultra.

Lesotho Ultra Trail

Lesotho is a small, mountainous country, completely surrounded by South Africa. Over 80% of Lesotho lies above 1,800m (5,906 ft). The Lesotho Ultra Trail is only 50K in length, but is a Skyrunning Ultra, featuring 2621m of vertical ascent and 2437m of vertical descent. The course consists of dirt roads, jeep tracks, rocky trails (the greater part of the course) and short sections of open grass. Stream crossings and loose rock are also featured.

This one’s The Big Dream.

Coming Up: ENDURrun 30K

ENDURrun 2014

Yes, you read the above dates correctly. The ENDURrun International is a 160K, 8-day, 7-stage event that takes place in Waterloo, Ontario.

Distances range from 10 km to the marathon, on both roads and trails. Runners can participate in the Ultimate category (all seven stages), the Sport category (the last three stages, comprising a 25.6K trail run, a 10K time trial, and a marathon), and the Guest category (any one of the stages). Seven-person relays are also an option.

This year, I’ve chosen to enter as a Guest (though I can see a future attempt in either the Sport or Ultimate categories). On August 12, I’ll run Stage 3 of the ENDURrun, which is a multi-loop 30K cross-country course. According to the event website, it comprises mostly grass and wood chip paths, mostly through forest trails. It sounds interesting and fun, and will give me a chance to suss out the organization and locale a bit.

ENDURrun Stage 3

Looks like I’ll be putting in some trail and hill training in the next few weeks!

Birthday!

1948 Limited Edition

Today’s my birthday. I’m now 66 years old.

Funnily enough, that doesn’t seem old. I’m aware of having lived for a (relatively) long time, but that’s not the same as feeling old. I’ve been through adventures and misadventures, good and bad health, smart moves and some very dumb ones, and I’ve got the scars (physical and psychological) to show for the journey. For all the ups and downs, though, I’ve ended up in a good space. I’m a happy man.

All in all, it seems to me that 66 is a nice number. What surprises me is how much I’m looking forward to 70. :-)

Good Things

Bedrock Sandals Synclines

My Bedrock Syncline sandals arrived soon after I got home from the Elk/Beaver 50K ultra. I’ve been wearing them ever since. As I said in the review I posted previously, “The Synclines represent the evolutionary peak of minimalist sandals technology for me right now.”

They’re just plain good. They’re great on the roads, and they’re great on the trails. They’ve made my post-EB healing journey a pleasure rather than a chore, and they promise to deliver even more quality in the weeks and months to come.

Ditch those running shoes and get yourself some Synclines. You’ll thank me!

Kinetic Revolution 30 Day Challenge

James Dunne’s 30 day challenge has been a revelation. Each day of the free program offers a specific 10 to 15 minute set of targeted techniques, drills and exercises, with the promise that, if followed consistently, they will “transform your running” in the course of a month.

It’s working.

Today is day 10 of the challenge. It’s getting harder as the days go by, but in a good way. I know my muscles are being worked, and I can see results. My daily runs – whether long or short, fast or slow – are significantly improved in terms of form, pace, and feel. I’ve been lazy about my training for quite a while, content just to muddle along, so I’m pleased that I’ve finally hunkered down to do something worthwhile.

In fact, I’m so impressed with James’ training that I’m about to sign up for his six-week online course. I’m a Kinetic Revolution believer!

Music

As I noted in a previous post, I recently started listening to music again after an absence of many years. I don’t carry my iPod all the time, but I enjoy having music for many of my long runs. The playlist I listen to most often is a mix of blues and psychedelia. Think mid to late 1960s. Think Chicago and San Francisco. Think tracks like Crystal Blues, by the always wonderful Country Joe and the Fish. Have a listen:

Good things happen. Life is good!